A popular translation of a Confucian saying says: “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.” There are continuing researches on “styles of learning”, and continuing discussions on the variable factors in the learning process. What all agree upon is that learning does not always happen, nor does it only happen, by lecturing to the learner. (Ingenium’s own philosophy in this regard is explained under Mission/Vision: Philosophy and Practice of Ingenium.)

And so, for the Ingenium student, his/her learning process is not confined to the classroom, although the classroom always remains as a privileged locus of learning. Beyond the classtroom,   the life of the Ingenium student is a very rich one, punctuated by a whole variety and wide range of activities throughout the school year. This is very much in line with the fundamental objective of Ingenium—the total formation of the individual person that is the student. The intellectual formation through the academic programs is central in a school, but intellectual formation is not the only focus of Ingenium. The focus of concern is “the person”. As more fully explained above, sensible experiences and imagination provide the material for understanding and insight, beyond understanding and insight, there is the judgment on the correctness or truth of one’s insight; and beyond judgment of  truth, there is the responsibility of choice and action; and beyond the individual there is the community of which the individual is a part; and beyond the individual in society, there is the whole stance of the individual towards life within a given culture. Such total formation is what Ingenium is all about.

How does one form such a complex multi-faceted person that is the student?

Part of the answer is to engage the student in a whole range of activities that offer the greatest chance of developing his/her many, interconnected, evolving gifts and native talents—his/her “ingenium”—and mold these talents in the direction of the core values of the school.

The pictures try to give an idea of the number and variety of these activities.